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English year 1

English year 2

English year 3

English year 4

 

English Tenses

  Simple Present

  Simple Past

  Present Perfect

  Past Perfect

  Simple Future - will Future

  Future Perfect

  Going-to-Future

 Continuous Tenses

  Present Continuous

  Past Continuous

  Present Perfect Continuous

  Past Perfect Continuous

  Simple Future Continuous

  Future Perfect Continuous

  Worksheets Tenses

Comparison of Tenses

If clauses - Conditional

Active Passive exercises

Reported Speech

 

More exercises...

 

 

Start I English grammar

English Grammar

 

Free English Grammar Guide - English Grammar Rules - Learn English

 

"a little" and "a few" +

the time

a and an +

a lot of and lots of +

adverbs - adverbs of frequency +

"be", "to be"  +

can and can't  +

date exercises  +

expressions of quantity +

'Have got' or 'has got' +

"little" or "a few"

Exercises - all adverbs of quantity

Much or many? +

Must and needn't 'needn't' +

English Plural +

present progressive exercises

questions with question words +

possessive pronouns - English +

prepositions Englsih grammar +

s-gentitive exercises +

Simple Past

Simple Present exercises

the time

the tenses

There is or there are? +

vocabulary-exercises

word order English

word order affirmative clause:  subject, verb, object and place. Grammar.

word order in statements:  subject, verb, object and time. English Grammar.

word order in statements:  subject, verb, object, place and time. Grammar.

'Would like to' and 'want to'

 

Present - English tenses

Simple Present

Present Continuous (Present Progressive)

Simple Present or Present Continuous (Present Progressive)

Tests Simple Present or Present Continuous (Present Progressive) Comparison Tenses

 

Simple past - English tenses

Simple past

Past Continuous (Past Progressive)

Simple past or Past Continuous (Past Progressive) Comparison of Tenses

Simple Past or Past Perfect Comparison of Tenses

 

Present Perfect - English tenses

Present Perfect

Present Perfect Continuous (Present Perfect Progressive)

Present Perfect or Simple Past Comparison of Tenses Comparison of Tenses

 

Past Perfect - English tenses

Past Perfect

Past Perfect Continuous (Past Perfect Progressive)

Past Perfect or Simple Past Comparison of Tenses

 

Future

Simple future 1

Going-to-Future

Future 1 Continuous (Future Progressive)

Will Future or Going-to-Future Comparison of Tenses

 

Future 2 - Future perfect

Future perfect

Future perfect Continuous (Future Perfect Progressive)

a

  English Tenses exercises

  Simple Present Tense

  Simple Past Tense

  Present Perfect

  Past Perfect

  Simple Future - Will Future

  Going-to-Future

  Continuous Tenses

  Comparison of Tenses

  Active and Passive Voice

  If clauses - conditionals

  Reported Speech

 

A few a little

 

 few or little - Expressions of quantity - Learning English

 

a few or a little?

 

"a few ..."

"(A) few ..." Use a few with plurals. Examples: a few pounds, a trees a few boys, a few girls, a few stones, a few cars.

 

Examples: 

 

There are just a few examples.

I meet a few friends

I see a few hundred pupils.

I've got few brothers.

 

"a little...

 

Use a little with nouns you cannot count. Examples: water, milk, sand, air.
 

Examples: 

 

There is little tea left.

Not a lot, only a little, please.

I've got little money.

 


English grammar exercises

a few and a little:

01 a little or a few English exercises

02 a little or a few

03 a little or a few  exercises

04 a little or a few

Indefinite articles - English grammar

a or an and the - Indefinite and definite articles  - Learning English

 

Definite an indefinite articles

 

- Indefinite articles

 

Use a or an when you say what a thing or a person is.

 

A before a consonant

 

Examples: a friend, a box, a room, a farmer, a driver, a teacher

 

An before a vowel

 

Examples: an apple, an animal, an uncle, an ashtray, an apple

 

Exceptions:

 

Examples: a user, a unit, a university

 

- Definite articles

 

Examples: the ball, the bag, the house, the apple, the piano, the computer

 


English grammareExercises

Indefinite articles:

01  indefinite articles 

02  indefinite article a

03  indefinite article an 

04  A or an? 

05  A or an? 

06  A or an 

07  A and an zuordnen

08  A and an in sentences

09  A or an?

10  A or an? 

11  definite article 'the'

A lot of - lots of - English grammar

 a lot of / lots of - Expressions of quantity - Learning English

 

 a lot of / lots of

 

Use a lot of or lots of for nouns, you cannot count and for plurals.

 

For countable and uncountable nouns use exact quantities in your answer or use  a lot of  / lots of.   Examples: I've got 10 pens. I'v got a lot of pens.

 

Examples: 

 

There are 10 pupils.

There are a lot of cookies.

They have got a lot of CDs.

There are a lot of things on your table.

We have got lots of money.

 


English grammar exercises

a lot of - lots of:

01 a lot of

02 a lot of

03 a lot of

04 much, many, a lot of

05 much, many, a lot of

adverbs of frequency - English grammar

Adverbs of frequency - English - Learning English

 

Adverbs of frequency

 

Adverbs of frequency are words like always, ever, never, often, seldom, sometimes. Diese Adverbien drücken aus, wie häufig etwas geschieht.

 

An adverb of frequency goes before a main verb. (except with to be).

 

Examples: 

 

Tim always arrives at school early.

We often play table tennis.

They never eat meat.

Sarah has sometimes got money.

 

Note the exact position in a sentence: to be

 

Adverbs of frequency go after the first auxiliary verb...

 

Examples: 

 

Jack is always late at school.

She is sometimes tired.

They are often in the swimming pool.

 

Some adverbs have can their position at the start of a sentence.

Examples: often, sometimes and usually.

 


English grammar exercises

Adverbs of frequency:

English: Adverbs of frequency

01 'always' Adverbs of frequency word order

02 'never' Adverbs of frequency word order

03 'sometimes' Adverbs of frequency word order

04 'often' Adverbs of frequency word order

05 mixed exercisesg  Adverbs of frequency

06 Adverbs of frequency Satzbau

to be - English grammar

to be - The verb 'to be' - Learning English

 

The English verb 'to be'

 

  Simple Present Simple Past
 

I am

you are

he is

she is

it is

we are

you are

they are

I was  

you were

he was

she was

it was

we were

you were

they were

 

  Simple present negative Simple Past negative
  English short form English short form
 

I am not

you are not

he is not

she is not

it is not

we are not

you are not

they are not

I'm not

you aren't

he isn't

she isn't

it isn't

we aren't

you aren't

they aren't

I was not

you were not

he was not

she was not

it was not

we were not

you were not

they were not

I wasn't

you weren't

he wasn't

she wasn't

it wasn't

we weren't

you weren't

they weren't

 

  Simple Present Progressive Simple Past Progressive
  English English
 

I am going

you are going

he is going

she is going

it is going

we are going

you are going

they are going

I was going

you were going

he was going

she was going

it was going

we were going

you were going

they were going

 


English grammar exercises

to be:

01 to be  - first easy exercises

02 to be  the verb 'to be'

03 to be  exercises

04 to be questions  Exercises

05 to be  with this and that

06 to be  all forms

07 to be  all forms

08 to be  exercises

09 the verb "to be"

can and can't - English grammar

Can and can't - rules and exercises - Auxiliary verbs. Learning English

 

Auxiliary verb can (positive) and can't (negative)

 

Use can, when you ask someone to do things. Use 'can' to talk about 'possibility'. Allways use can with another verb.

 

I can = I know to do something. / I know that something is possible for me.

 

I can write a letter.

 

Form the negative

 

Add "not" after can to form "cannot". can + not = cannot

When we are speaking, use 'can't'!

 

You can contract the negative: can + not = can't (normal use)

 

Present Simple Present Simple negative

I can write a letter.

You can write a letter.

He / She / It can write  a letter.

We can write a letter.

You can write a letter.

They can write a letter.

I can't write a letter.

You can't write a letter.

He / She / It can't write  a letter.

We can't write a letter.

You can't write a letter.

They can't write a letter.

 

Questions and short answers with can

 

Questions

 Short form

 positive

Short form

negative

 

Can I write a letter?

Can you write a letter?

Can he / she / it  write  a letter?

Can we write a letter?

Can you write a letter?

Can they write a letter?

 

Yes, you can.

Yes, I can.

Yes, her can.

Yes, you can.

Yes we can.

Yes they can.

 

No, you can't.

No, can't.

No, can't.

No, you can't.

No, we can't.

No, they can't.

 

Present Simple negative Present Simple negative

I can write a letter.

I cannot  write a letter.

 


English grammar exercises

to be:

01 can - exercises  English exercises with 'can'

02 can grammar exercises  grammar exercises

03 can - negative form  exercises with 'can'

04 Can and can't  Use ´'can' and 'can't'

05 can - questions  Complete centenses

06 'can' matching exercise  Matching exercises

07 questions with 'can' English grammar

08 questions with 'can'  Make questions

09 mixed exercises 'can'  rammar exercises

10 Can: negative and questions Questions

The English date - English grammar

Days, months and the date - learning English

The days of the week - English

English English short form

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

The months of the year - English

English English Short form

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

-

-

-

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

 

Read and write the days of the week and months

 

 in

figures

 in words

 in

figures

 in words

 

 

1st    May

2nd   May

3rd   May

4th   May

5th   May

6th   May

7th   May

8th   May

9th   May

10th May

16th May

23rd May

27th May

30th May

 

 the first of May

 the second of May 

 the third of May

 the forth of May

 the fifth of May

 the sixth of May

 the seventh of May

 the eighth of May

 the ninth May

 the tenth of May

 the sixteenth of May

 the twenty-third of May

 the twenty-seventh of May

 the thirtieth of May

 

May 1

May 2

May 23

May 30

 

 

May the first

May the second

May the twenty-third

May the thirthieth

 

 

Read and write the days of the week, months and the year

 

Writing:

Speaking:

 

1st    May 2013

2nd   May 2013

3rd   May 2013

4th   May 2013

5th   May 2013

6th   May 2013

7th   May 2013

8th   May 2013

9th   May 2013

10th May 2013

16th May 2013

23rd May 2013

27th May 2013

30th May 2013

 

the first May two thousand and thirteen

the second May two thousand and thirteen

the third May two thousand and thirteen

the forth May two thousand and thirteen

the fifth May two thousand and thirteen

the sixth May two thousand and thirteen

the seventh May two thousand and thirteen

the eighth May two thousand and thirteen

the ninth May two thousand and thirteen

the tenth may two thousand and thirteen

the sixteenth May two thousand and thirteen

the twenty-third May two thousand and thirteen

the twenty-seventh May two thousand and thirteen

the thirtieth May two thousand and thirteen

 

Or: 14.06.2013 (fourteenth of June two thousand and thirteen)

 

AD stands for Anno Domini.

BC stands for Before Christ.

A century is a period of one hundred.

A decade is a period of 10 years.

 

Use 'in' months and years and periods of time:
• in January
• in 1978
• in the twenties

 


English grammar exercises

the date:

English: The date. The date with exercises and rules.

01 English date rules Exercises

02 English date written Exercises

03 Date English written Exercise

04 Date English format

Expressions of quantity - English grammar exercises

much - many - a few - a little. Expressions of quantity. Learning English

 

An expression of quantity tells the amount of something.

 

much or many? few or little?

 

"much" - not countable

 

"How much...?" With uncountable nouns in negative and questions.

 

Examples: 

 

How much homework do we get?

How much money do I need?

How much milk do you want?

Is there much sugar in my tea?

 

"many" -  countable nouns

 

With countable nouns in negative and questions.

 

Examples: 

 

How many sisters does he have?

How many pupils are in this class?

How many books do you buy?

How many cows live on this farm?

 

"a few ..." countable nouns

 

Use "(A) few ..." with countable nouns.

 

Examples: 

 

There are just a few examples.

I meet a few friends

I see a few hundred pupils.

I've got few brothers.

 

"a little..." uncountable

 

Use "a little" with uncountable nouns.
 

Examples: 

 

There is little tea left.

Not a lot, only a little, please.

I've got little money.

 

Countable nouns and uncountable nouns

 

a lot of  / lots of Use an exact quantity or a lot of / lots of

 

Examples: 

 

There are 10 pupils.

There are a lot of cookies

They have got a lot of CDs.

There are a lot of things on your table.

We have got lots of money.

 

Note: Use of much in statements. Use much only in questions and negative sentences.

 


English grammar exercises

expressions of quantity:

Much or many?

01 much or many - exercises

02 much or many - exercises

03 much or many?

04 much or many?

05 much or many and rules

06 much or many - difference

 

a little or a few?

07 a little or a few

08 a little or a few

09 a little or a few

10 a little or a few

 

a lot of or lots of?

01 a lot of

02 a lot of - Exercises

03 a lot of - Exercises

04 much, many, a lot of

05 much, many, a lot of

'have got' and 'has got' - English grammar exercises

 'have got' or 'has got' - Learning English with online exercises

 

"Have got" or has got is used to show possession.

 

Negative forms of have got  and  has got

 

 Have + not + got and has + not + got.

 

Short form:

 

I have got a book.

You have got a book.

He, She, It has got a book.

We have got a book.

You have got a book.

They have got a book.

Long form:

 

I have not got a book.

You have not got   a book.

He/ She/ It has not got a book.

We have not got  a book.

You have not got  a book.

They have not got  a book.

 

Short form

"Have got" =  've got or 's got.

"Have not got" =  haven't got or hasn't got.

 

Short form:

 

I 've got a book.

You 've got a book.

He, She, It 's got a book.

We 've got a book.

You 've got a book.

They 've got a book.

Long form:

 

I haven't got  a book.

You haven't got   a book.

He/ She/ It hasn't got a book.

We haven't got  a book.

You haven't got  a book.

They haven't got  a book.

 

Questions and short answers with have got and has got.

 

Question:

 

Have I got a book?

Have you got a book?

Has he/ she/ it got a book?

Have we got a book?

Have you got a book?

Have they got a book?

Short Answer:

 

Yes, you have.

Yes, I have.

Yes, he/ she /it has.

Yes, you have.

Yes, we have.

Yes, they have.

 Negative Answer:

 

No, you haven't.

No, I haven't.

No, he/ she /it hasn't.

No, you haven't.

No, we haven't.

No, they haven't.

 


English grammar exercises

have got and has got:

have got and has got - long form

01 Have got or has got Have got and has got

02 Have got or has got exercises long forms

03 have not got - has not got  negative

04 have not got - has not got negative

 

05 have got or has got  questions

06 have got / has got, Übung questions

07 have got English exercises with habe got

08 has not got Negative sentences

 

have got and has got - short form

09 've got or 's got 've got and 's got

10 've got or 's got 've got and 's got

11 haven't got or hasn't got 've got and 's got

12 haven't got or hasn't got 've got and 's got

13 sentences with have got short form

14 short form 'have got' have got

'much' and 'many' - English grammar exercises

 much - many - expressions of quantity - English online learning.

 

much and many with exercises and rules

 

"much" - uncountable

 

Use "how much...?" with uncountable nouns.

 

Examples: 

 

How much homework do we get?

How much money do I need?

How much milk do you want?

Is there much sugar in my tea?

 

"many" - countable

 

Use "how many...?" with countable nouns.

 

Examples: 

 

How many sisters does he have?

How many pupils are in this class?

How many books do you buy?

How many cows live on this farm?

 


English grammar exercises

much and many:

Much or many?

01 much or many - exercises exercises

02 much or many - exercises exercises

03 much or many? easy to learn 'much'

04 much or many? Much and many

05 much or many mit rules. Much and many

06 much or many

'must' and 'needn't' - English grammar exercises

Must and needn't - Learning English

 

Must and mustn't

 

must

 

Use always must to say it is necessary to do something.

Use  mustn't to say it is necessary not to do something.

 

Examples: 

 

It is necessary to stop the car.

 

I must stop the car.

You must stop the car

He / She / It must stop the car.

We must stop the car.

You must stop the car.

They must stop the car.

Examples: 

It is necessary not to stop the car.

 

I mustn't stop the car.

You mustn't stop the car

He / She / It mustn't stop the car.

We mustn't stop the car.

You mustn't stop the car.

They mustn't stop the car

 

needn't

 

Use needn't when there is no obligation.

 

I (you, he, she, it, we, you, they) needn't run.

 

You needn't. go to the cinema (, but you can if you want).

 

After needn't (infinitive) of another verb.

 

Examples:

I needn't stop the car     (, but I can if you want).

You needn't stop the car

He / She / It needn't stop the car.

We needn't stop the car.

You needn't stop the car.

They needn't stop the car.

 


English grammar exercises

must and need't:

01 'must' sentences with must - exerxcíses

02 must  sentences with must

03 Sätze mit must  write sentences

04 Sätze mit must  write sentences

05 mustn't - Sentences with mustn't

06 needn't - How to use needn't.

07 Must, mustn't or needn't Sentences

08 must, mustn't and needn't Sentences

Plural and plural s - English grammar

Plural - s English - Learning English

Plural: Add the letter s to the end of the noun noun.

Examples for the plural in English:

 

an apple - two apples

a girl - two girls

a pencil - five pencels

 

Exceptions

 

Plural s: Nouns that end in -ch, -x, -s, -sh, z or s-like, the plural is formed by adding 'e' to the end of the word.

 

Examples for the plural in English:

 

a church - two churches

a sandwich - two sandwiches

a witch - two witches

a box - two boxes

 

Is there an e at the end of the noun, the plural is formed by adding 's' to the end of the word.

 

Examples for the plural in English:

 

a rose - five roses

a page - ten pages

 

Nouns ending in a consonant and y.

 

Nouns ending in a consonant and y, drop the y and add 'ies'.

 

Examples for the plural in English:

 

a city - five cities

a lady - two ladies

a party - two parties

 


English grammar exercises

plural and plural-s:

Plural - grammar

01 Plural  Plural-s

02 Plural English Singular or Plural?

03 Singular - plural

04 Singular or Plural exercises

Possessive pronouns, possessives - grammar exercises

 Possessives - Possessive determiners - Learning English

Possessives are words like my, mine, your, his, her, our, them (possessive adjectives).

 

 Examples for possessives:

 

  personal pronoun Possessives
 

I

you

 he

she

 it

 we

 you

 they

 

my

your

his

her

its

our

your

their

 

 

 

Examples with easy exercises and grammar rules possessive pronouns

 

  Pronomen    possessive pronouns
  English      English  
 

I live in England.

You are 13.

He is at school.

She has a cat.

We like the red car.

You are late.

They visit Bristol.

My book is new  

Your brother is Tom.  

His name is John.   

Her cat is white.  

Our car is red.  

Your school starts at 8.00 o'clock.  

Their city is old.

 

 

Short forms of possessives:

 

 your    

 its

 their

/

/

/

your're = you are

it's = it is

they're = they are

 


English grammar exercises

a few and a little:

possessive pronouns   -   possessives

01 Possessive pronouns my, your, his, her, its

02 Possessive determiners  my, your, his, her

03 possessive pronouns - possessive pronouns

04 possessive pronouns - possessive pronouns

05 possessive pronouns English: my, your, his

06 possessive pronouns English: my, your, his

07 English possessive pronouns: my, your, his

08 English possessive pronouns: my, your, his

Prepositions - grammar exercises

 Prepositions - English grammar - Learning English

Prepositions are words like:

on, under, at, in, from ...

about, across, after, against, among, around, at, before, behind, beside, between, but, down, during, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, under, until, up, upon, with, within, without.

Preposition describe a relationship between other words in a sentence. Prepositions show relationships between nouns. Most often, prepositions come before a noun.

Examples for prepositions:

 

The Mouse is under the table.

The tree is in the garden.

John is from London.

He goes into the kitchen.

 

Prepositions never change their form.

 


English grammar exercises

Prepositions:

01 Fill in the prepositions  prepositions at...

02 Übe folgende prepositions  : at, behind, in...

03 prepositions exercise  Matching exercise for

04 English prepositions   from, in, into, on, under

05 Prepositions - English prepositions

Question words - grammar exercises

Questions with question  words  -  English Grammar with exercises

Question words: Who...?, What...?, How...? and Where...?

Use question words at the start of a sentence.

Examples for questions with questions words:

 

Who is Mr Jones?

What's in the garden?

How old is Mike?

Where is Jane?

 

Question words Examples

how?

how many?

how much?

how long?

how often?

what?

who?

when?

where?

which?

whose?

why?

manner

quantity (countable)

quantity (uncountable)

length

frequency

idea or action

persons

time

place

choice

possession

reason

How are you?

How many books?

How much milk?

How long is your weekend?

How often do you swim?

What is you favourite sport?

Who is Peter?

When do you go to school?

Where do you go?

Which car do you like?

Whose bag is this?

Why are you tired?

 

English - qestion words - exercises. Questions with question words with English grammar exercises.

 


English grammar exercises

Questions and question words:

01 Questions with question words Use Who...?

02 Question words Question words Who...?

03 Write questions  Write setences - questions

04 English question words Who...?, What...?,

05 Question words  English grammar Who...?,

06 English questions Who...?, What...?, ...

07 English questions Who...?, What...?, ...

08 Questions with question words  Who...?,...

S-genitive - English grammar exercises

S-Genitive English Grammar - Learning English

Genitive s: It is used to show possession.

  one cat two or more cats
one girl the girl's cat the girl's cats
two or more girls the girls' cat the girls' cats

The number of cats does not matter. The structure is changed by the subject.

Examples genitive s:

 

Tom's pen.             The pen belongs to Tom.

Sarah's brother.

Dad's car.

 

The noun ends with an s

 

Singular noun: Add '.

 

Example:

 

The girls' book is new.

 

More nouns belonging together

 

add ' only to the last noun.

 

Example:

 

Sally and Sarah's father is 41.

 

Plural form ending in -s

 

Plural form ending in -s: Only add '.

 

Example:

 

The teachers' cars.

The boys' games.

 


English grammar exercises

Genitive-s:

S-genitive - s-genitive exercises

01 s-Genitive  - s-genitive exercise

02 s-Genitive exercises genitive-s

03 s-Genitiv or Plural-s Genitive-s and plural-s

04 s-Genitive or Plural-s  Genitive-s and plural-s

05 s-Genitive or Plural-s  exercises

There is - there are grammar exercises

There is or there are? Learning English with grammar exercises.

 

There is and there are means something exists.

 

There is

 

Use "there is" (there's) for a  noun - singular.

 

Example:

 

There is a mouse in the bag.

 

There are

 

Use "there are" for a noun - plural.

 

Example:

 

There are four girls in a team.

 

There is = there's

 

The contraction of there is is there's.

There is no short form for there are!

 

Negativ form of "there is" and "there are"

 

Examples:

 

There is a car.

There are four balls.

 

 

There isn't a car.

There aren't four balls. 

 

Place there is and there are at the start of a sentence.

 

Questions with there is and there are

 

Place is or are in front of there to form a question.

 

Examples:

 

There is a book on the table.

Is there a book on the table

 

There are books on the table.

Are there books on the table?

 


 

English grammar exercises

'there is' and 'there are':

There is and there are, exercises

01 there is  There is and there are

02 there are grammar exercise

03 There is / there are?  Exercises for there is

04 there is or there are  There is and there are

05 There is or there are  Exercises for there is

06 questions is there / are there questions

07 questions is there -are there  questions

08 Is there - are there  questions with is there

09 Mixed exercsies Write sentences with there is

The time - grammar exercises

The time - English learning

 

The Time - English

 

 

 

 

 It's five to one.

 It's ten to two.

 It's quarter to three.

 It's twenty to four.

 It's twenty-five to five.

 It's twenty-seven to seven.

 ---  

 

 It's five past one.

 It's ten past two.

 It's quarter past three.

 It's twenty past four.

 Its twenty-five past five.

 It's twenty-seven past seven.

 It's half past eight.

 

Ante meridiem (am) and post meridiem (pm)

 


English grammar exercises

The time - exercises:

The English time - Reading and writing

01 The English time - exercises for writing

02 The time half past - English grammar

03 English time quarter past  - English time

04 quarter to  English - time - exercises

05 Learning English time exercises

06 English time - exercises exercises

07 the time - exercises English grammar

08 the time English English time  exercises

09 use of the English time - English time

word order - grammar exercises

word order - grammar  exercises - English learning

Word order: Subject verb, object.

Word order - English: S -  V - O

Examples:

 

Jenny likes tennis.

Bob is a pupil.

We play computer games.

 

Place and time normally at the end of a sentence or at the start.

 

Examples:

 

After school she plays tennis.

He watches TV at home.

 

Place and time in one sentence

 

Use first the place, then the time.

 

Examples:

 

I play football at school in the afternoon.

John reads a book in the park after lunch.

 

 

Example:

 

After lunch John reads a book in the park.

 


English grammar exercises

Word order:

Word order / Word order in statements - English - word order S-V-O

01 word order English - S-V-O

02 word order English - S-V-O

03 word order English - S-V-O

04 word order English - S-V-O

05 word order English - S-V-O

06 word order English - S-V-O

07 word order English - S-V-O

08 word order English - S-V-O

09 word order English - S-V-O

10 word order English - S-V-O

 

Word order in statements: Subject, verb, object, place

11 Exercises word order S-V-O and place

12 Exercises word order  S-V-O and place

13 Exercises word order S-V-O and place

14 Exercises word order English, S-V-O and place

15 Exercises word order S-V-O and place

16 Exercises word order S-V-O and place

17 Exercises word order S-V-O and place

18 Exercises word order  S-V-O and place

19 Exercises word order  S-V-O and place

20 Exercises word order S-V-O and place

 

Word order in statements: subject, verb, object, time

21 word order English, S-V-O and time

22 word order English, S-V-O and time

23 word order English, S-V-O and time

24 word order English, S-V-O and time

25 word order English, S-V-O and time

26 word order English, S-V-O and time

27 word order English, S-V-O and time

28 word order English, S-V-O and time

29 word order English, S-V-O and time

30 word order English, S-V-O and time

 

Word order in statements: subject, verb, object, place, time

31 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

32 Exercises word order English, S-V-O,place and time

33 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

34 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

35 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

36 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

37 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

38 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

39 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

40 Exercises word order S-V-O,place and time

 

'Would like to' and 'want to' - grammar exercises

 

'would like to' and 'want to' - English grammar

 

Would like (loving to do something)

 

Would like or 'd like (short form). The main verb is always the infinitive.

 

Examples for the long form of 'would like':

 

I would like to go for a walk. (= I love going for a walk.)

Sue would like to make a pizza now. (= Sue loves making a pizza.)

We would like to have dinner.

They would like to go to a restaurant.

 

Would like to - short form

 

Examples for the short form of 'would like':

 

I 'd like to go for a walk.

Sue 'd like to make a pizza now.

We 'd like to have dinner.

They 'd like to go to a restaurant.

 

wouldn't like to - negative:

 

Examples for wouldn't like

 

Sue wouldn't like to make a pizza now.

We wouldn't like to have dinner.

 

Would like to - questions

 

Examples: 

 

Would you like to go for a walk?

Would Sue like to make a pizza now?

Would  we like to have dinner?

Would they  like to go to a restaurant?

 

Want to (a matter of fact statement)

 

Examples - 'want to'

 

I want to go shoppping. 

Sally wants to read the book.

I want to eat this cake!

 

Want to - negative

 

Examples

 

I don't want to go shoppping. 

Sally doesn't want to read the book.

 

Want to - questions

 

Examples:

 

Does Sally want to read the book?

 


English grammar exercises

a few and a little:

would like to and want to - exercises

01 would like to  Online exercices

02 questions 'would like to' questions

03 'wouldn't like to'  negative sentences

04 sentences with 'want to'  Write sentences

05 negative sentences 'don't want to' 

06 questions with 'want to'  : Do we want to

 

 

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